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Register & Pay by April 15 and deduct $50 from total cost for  the May MiniMester or Internship!

May MiniMester – Deadline to Enroll is May 12

Mondays through Saturdays (Evening classes Mondays-Fridays), May 11 – 23, 2020 = 12 class days

May MiniMester Classes:

Last day to enroll in this term is May 12, 2020 at noon.
Last day to withdraw from this term with a “W” grade is May 20, 2020 at noon.

Due to the on-campus experiential nature of some MiniMester courses and the College’s decision to move to remote instruction for the May and June MiniMesters, availability of some courses is subject to change. 

Costs

3 credits: $1,200*
4 credits: $1,600*
6 credits: $2,400*
12 credits: $4,800*

*Note: You must pay for your May Minimester in full at the time of registration in order to be officially enrolled.

Additional Costs

As the College is moving to remote instruction for May and June MiniMesters, room and board for the May MiniMester is not available.

Bentsen Learning Center (BLC): Students needing BLC assistance in the May Term will have an additional cost of: $520

Summer Internships – Deadline to Enroll is May 22

Internships: 

Students are encouraged to contact the Office of Integrative Career Development to discuss summer internship opportunities prior to registering online.

Contact: Paul Dunn at dunn_p@mitchell.edu or 860-701-7739 or register for an appointment via Starfish.

 

Regardless of the actual length of an internship, courses encompass the entire 13 weeks and all hours/paperwork/grades are officially submitted in August. Last day to enroll in an internship class is Friday May 22. Last day to withdraw from this term with a “W” grade is Friday, July 17.

Costs

3 credit Internship: $1,200*
6 credit Internship: $2,400*
12 credit Internship: $4,800*
*Note: You must pay for your internship in full at the time of registration in order to be officially enrolled.

QUESTIONS?
Contact the Registrar at:
860-701-5019 or registrar@mitchell.edu

May Minimester Courses

Course Title Instructor Time Notes Description
BI143 Fundamentals of Life Science Ramsay 8:00am - 1:00pm (M-Sat) meets the SR (Social Responsibility) requirement of the General Education Program and the Lab Science Requirement for Life and Physical Sciences. 4 credits (fall and spring) DA: L1 V Fundamentals of Life Science is an introductory course designed for non-science majors. Using scientific analytic techniques and problem solving skills, students will demonstrate and communicate how evolutionary theory connects and unifies the following principles: living organisms are highly organized, living organisms must take in and use energy (metabolism), living organisms must grow and reproduce, and humans are living organisms. Emphasis is placed on the nature of life at the cellular and molecular level and includes an understanding of 73 the functional and structural hierarchy from cells to ecosystems. The laboratory exercises will introduce students to the proper use of a microscope and will involve experiments and demonstrations illustrating the topics covered. Students will be required to use critical thinking skills to analyze and evaluate data.
CJ310 Criminal Justice in Film Curren 8:30am - Noon (M-Sat) meets CJ elective 3 credits (spring; winter and summer optional) DA: L2 CCT Prerequisite: CJ247, CJ245 or recommendation of the instructor. It is recommended that students have access to a Netflix account for this class. This course affords the student an opportunity to explore the theoretical underpinnings and institutions of the criminal justice system through film. The Crime Film will be examined as a cinematic genre with particular emphasis on lighting, camera angles and sound. Further, the course uses film to explore such issues as the nature of art, meaning, truth and justice and the relationship between popular culture and the institutions of the criminal justice system. Emphasis will be placed throughout on the influence of ethnicity, culture and gender in the films presented.
CO103 Effective Presentations Pinkham 5:30pm - 9:30pm (M-Fri) required core class 3 credits DA: L 1 C This course is designed to increase your effectiveness as a communicator and presenter by emphasizing critical thinking, careful research, organization, and delivery strategies. NOTE: A minimum grade of C- is required to meet graduation requirements.
CO216 Film Genre: Horror Medeiros 1:00pm – 4:30pm (M-Sat) meets Fine Arts requirement 3 credits DA: L2 CCT Issues of gender, sexuality, psychological dysfunction, and sociological fears have always been central to the horror film. These fears create and shape such monstrous images as Dracula, Norman Bates, Rosemary’s baby, and “the shape.” But what makes these 126 images horrific? In this course we will watch a variety of classic and contemporary horror films with the goal of understanding how what is considered scary or monstrous in such films often relates to anxieties surrounding sexuality, difference, and social change. In addition to weekly screenings, students will read and discuss a variety of reviews, critical essays, and theoretical texts.
CW102 College Writing & Research McDonald 9:00am – 12:30pm (M-Sat) required core class 3 credits (fall and spring) DA: L1 C Prerequisites: CW101 (C- grade or better), the equivalent, or permission of the instructor. This course reinforces the skills taught in CW101 while introducing students to the procedures of academic and professional research. Assignments will emphasize writing to analyze and synthesize ideas, information literacy skills for finding and evaluating appropriate sources, and proper documentation of sources. This is a writing intensive (WI) course, requiring students to submit a minimum of 15 pages of revised and edited text in finished form including a fully documented research paper. NOTE: A minimum grade of C- is required to meet graduation requirements and to enroll in 200-level or above English courses.
EL399 Sp Topics: Awkwardness & Apocalypse: YA Dystopian Literature Adler 9:00am – 12:30pm (M-Sat) meets EL requirement 3 credits DA: L3 CCT Prerequisites: CW102 (C- grade or better). We will meet teen characters who are coming of age in a stark, tense fictional world. This class will explore the attributes that make YA dystopian literature so popular. In this genre, teen characters grapple with totalitarian governments, anarchy, dying worlds, global health crises, crashing economies and futuristic technologies, but they still care about romance and they still need to handle those pesky parent figures. Two novels will be read in entirety – Neal Shusterman’s Scythe, as well as a YA dystopian novel of the student’s choice (with instructor approval). Students will keep a reading journal, write a book review of their free choice novel, and they will also write a YA dystopian short story. Scythe by Neal Shusterman (required text), Free choice YA Dystopia (possible choices below):The Hunger Games, Suzanne Collins (or any in the series), Divergent, Veronica Roth (or any in the series), Legend, Marie Lu (or any in the series), The Giver, Lois Lowry (or any in the series), Unwind, Neal Shusterman (or any in the series), Replica, Lauren Oliver (or any in the series), Red Rising, Pierce Brown (or any in the series).
HD305 Ethics/Char/Moral Dev Brailey 8:30am– noon (M-Sat) meets Ethics requirement 3 credits (fall) (E) DA: L2 V Prerequisite: HD108, PY105 and junior status. This course offers the student an opportunity to study the extent to which thinking and action can be applied to ethical and moral situations. T e course will provide an in-depth examination of ethics and morality, including historical, philosophical, religious, legal, sociological, multicultural, psychological and human developmental perspectives. A particular emphasis is placed on the identification and application of moral thinking skills designed to better understand and perhaps resolve ethical issues at the personal, interpersonal and professional levels.
LS350 LPS Career Seminar Morgan 8:30am– noon (M-Sat) meets Career Seminar requirement 3 credits (fall) DA: L2 SI Prerequisite: junior status and permission of the instructor; must be an LPS major. A practically-based course designed to expose the career paths available to liberal studies majors. Attention is focused on how to maximize opportunities to explore a diverse set of vocational possibilities. Particular emphasis is placed on the self-assessment of skills and aspirations, researching careers, networking, resume building, interviewing, and graduate school options. Lecture material and reading assignments are integrated with classroom guest speakers, and workshops.
SF230 Activity Leadership Peretz 8:30am – noon (M-Sat) meets PE requirement 3 credits DA: L2 SI This course will introduce students to leadership styles and their role in sport and fitness programming. Emphasis is on experiential learning of effective personal leadership techniques facilitating a positive participant experience. Direct leadership opportunities will be provided for all students.
PY105 General Psychology I Peter 8:30am– noon (M-Sat) meets BS requirement 3 credits (fall and spring) DA: L1 ICT Explores the scientific methods and principles of behavior. Includes areas of physiological psychology, sensation and perception, conditioning and learning, memory, and states of consciousness, motivation and emotion as major topics for lectures and discussions.

Internships

Internship Title Instructor Time Notes
BS340 Behavioral Science Internship I (3 cr) Mauro, Dunn Arranged Must have prior permission
BS440 Behavioral Science Internship II (3 cr) Mauro, Dunn Arranged Must have prior permission
BU420 Business Internship III (6 cr) Dunn Arranged Must have prior permission
BU425 Business Internship I (3 cr) Dunn Arranged Must have prior permission
BU426 Business Internship II (3 cr) Dunn Arranged Must have prior permission
CJ262 CJ Soph Field Experience (3 cr) Curren, Dunn Arranged Must have prior permission
CJ362 CJ Junior Field Experience (3 cr) Curren, Dunn Arranged Must have prior permission
CJ442 CJ Senior Field Experience (6 cr) Curren, Dunn Arranged Must have prior permission
CO443 Senior Fieldwork (3 cr) Ward, Dunn Arranged Must have prior permission
CO483 Comm Internship (3 cr) Ward, Dunn Arranged Must have prior permission
ES491 Environmental Studies Internship (3 cr) Ramsay, Dunn Arranged Must have prior permission
ES492 Environmental Studies Internship (6 cr) Ramsay, Dunn Arranged Must have prior permission
HE450 Health Science Internship (6 cr) Ramsay, Dunn Arranged Must have prior permission
HT350 Hosp/Tour Junior Internship (3 cr) Forcier, Dunn Arranged Must have prior permission
HT450 Hosp/Tour Senior Internship I (6 cr) Forcier, Dunn Arranged Must have prior permission
HT451 Hosp/Tour Senior Internship II (6 cr) Forcier, Dunn Arranged Must have prior permission
LS450 LPS Internship I (3 cr) Mauro, Dunn Arranged Must have prior permission
LS451 LPS Internship II (3 cr) Mauro, Dunn Arranged Must have prior permission
SM210 Sport/Fitness Practicum (3 cr) Kresge, Dunn Arranged Must have prior permission
SM450 Sport/Fitness Internship (6 cr) Roberts, Dunn Arranged Must have prior permission
SM451 Sport/Fitness Internship (12 cr) Roberts, Dunn Arranged Must have prior permission

Mitchell Summer Internships

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If you are looking for a college that: 

 

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…Mitchell College delivers in a powerful way.

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