Fall 2019

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Flex: Evening & Weekend Classes Begin September 4

Ready to finish (or begin) your degree? Propel your career? Challenge yourself? Learn new skills? Mitchell College flexes with your busy life by offering Evening and Weekend Classes, September 4-November 22, 2019.

New, prospective students, please contact Kelby Chappelle in Admissions at chappelle_k@mitchell.edu to get the ball rolling!

Currently enrolled Mitchell students, please connect with Advising today about scheduling classes for Fall 2019.

Last day to enroll in the Session I term is Wednesday, September 11, 2019 at 5:00pm

Last day to withdraw from this term with a “W” grade is Friday, November 1 at 5:00pm

Weekend Classes Session I

September 4-November 22, 2019

Course Title Time Notes Description
BU123 Introduction to Business 8:00am-12:10pm (Saturday) 3 credits Explores the nature of the American free enterprise system and its business organization. Gives students a broad overview of the functions, institutions, principles, practices and a working vocabulary of business. NOTE: BU123 is recommended for all students for personal or business use. It is recommended that students take BU123 before studying other business subjects. A minimum grade of C is required for business majors to enroll in additional business courses and to meet graduation requirements.
FC120 Information Technology Literacy 8:00am-12:10pm (Saturday) 3 credits This course is designed to introduce students to 21st Century technology literacy skills. By leveraging the knowledge and skills students have in using technology, this course, through a collaborative project based approach, will focus on developing an awareness and knowledge of how to critically analyze and determine the meaningfulness, relevance and applicability of acquired information. In addition, this course will help students enhance their technology literacy skills through the use of resources including Microsoft Office Suite, Presentation Software and Cloud Technologies/Services, and Advanced Technologies and Applications. NOTE: A minimum grade of C- is required to meet graduation requirements.
HI105 History of the United States I 10:30am-2:40pm (Saturday) 3 credits This introductory survey course examines the European colonization of North America, the challenges of the colonial era, including the American Revolution and development of constitutionalism as well as the early national period, the rise of Jacksonian Democracy, and the hardships faced by multiple groups such as Native American, African Americans and immigrants. Race-based slavery in America, western expansionism, the growth of political parties, women’s rights, and the causes and consequences of the Civil War will also be examined.
PY105 General Psychology I 8:00am-12:10pm (Saturday) 3 credits Explores the scientific methods and principles of behavior. Includes areas of physiological psychology, sensation and perception, conditioning and learning, memory, and states of consciousness, motivation and emotion as major topics for lectures and discussions. NOTE: One section will be designated for majors in the Department of Behavioral Sciences.

Evening Classes Session I

September 4-November 22, 2019

Course Title Time Notes Description
BU124 Marketing 4:40pm-6:40pm (M & Th) or 4:40pm-6:40pm (Tu & Fr) 3 credits Overviews all marketing activities, with specific study of market research, demographics, product development, pricing, retailing and wholesaling of goods, promotional activities, advertising, sales and selling steps. Uses marketing problems and cases as class activities.
CJ265 Probation and Parole 4:40pm-6:40pm (M & Th) 3 credits Prerequisite: CJ247 Probation and Parole will review the application of probation and parole methods in the criminal justice system. Organization and operation of these systems will be explored.
CW102 College Writing and Research 6:50pm-8:50pm (M & Th) 3 credits Prerequisite: CW101 (C- grade or better), the equivalent, or permission of the instructor. This course reinforces the skills taught in CW101 while introducing students to the procedures of academic and professional research. Assignments will emphasize writing to analyze and synthesize ideas, information literacy skills for finding and evaluating appropriate sources, and proper documentation of sources. This is a writing intensive (WI) course, requiring students to submit a minimum of 15 pages of revised and edited text in finished form including a fully documented research paper. NOTE: A minimum grade of C- is required to meet graduation requirements and to enroll in 200-level or above English courses.
ED274 Literacy Develop. Early Childhood Education 4:40pm-6:40pm (M & Th) 3 credits Pre-Practicum Component: 20-25 hours in PreK–K Prerequisite: ED110, ED222 This course provides a greater understanding of the importance of early childhood education and its relationship to early literacy development. The students will explore such topics as symbol systems, abstractions, comprehension, schema development and prior knowledge as they relate to the emerging sense of literacy. Stories, songs, rhymes, riddles, poetry, short stories, picture books, and the world of children’s literature are also included in connection to early childhood education programs and kindergarten settings, family, school and the community. Standards of National Association of Young Children and Common Core State Standards are used.
FC120 Information Technology Literacy 6:50pm-8:50pm (M & Th) 3 credits This course is designed to introduce students to 21st Century technology literacy skills. By leveraging the knowledge and skills students have in using technology, this course, through a collaborative project based approach, will focus on developing an awareness and knowledge of how to critically analyze and determine the meaningfulness, relevance and applicability of acquired information. In addition, this course will help students enhance their technology literacy skills through the use of resources including Microsoft Office Suite, Presentation Software and Cloud Technologies/Services, and Advanced Technologies and Applications. NOTE: A minimum grade of C- is required to meet graduation requirements.
HU215 World Geography of Tourism 4:40pm-6:40pm (M & Th) 3 credits This course is an introduction to world geography through the lens of tourism destinations and markets. Students explore and gain a functional base knowledge about physical-environmental, socio-cultural, and geopolitical influences on the travel and tourism industry. Students investigate the fundamental link between international travel and world geography. Emphasis is place on the strategic location of specific destinations, characteristics of the tourist markets, and the transportation infrastructure and hospitality superstructure found in major destinations. In addition, this course will focus on international travel patterns and trends.
PY313 Death and Dying 4:40pm-6:40pm (M & Th) 3 credits Prerequisite: HD305 Death and Dying offers a multidisciplinary approach to the study of thanatology. Topics include psychological states of the dying process, attitudes toward death, the physiology of death, counseling the terminally ill, the Hospice concept, widowhood, bereavement and mourning, suicide, funerals, family support, and the treatment of the deceased from a historical standpoint.
SM302 Sport Facilities (HYBRID: portions will be online) 6:50pm-8:50pm (M) 3 credits Prerequisite: SM110 and junior or senior status or permission of the instructor. This course investigates the functions of management in terms of planning, building, operating, and financing public assembly facilities and special sport event venue management, including public and private arenas, stadiums, and multi-purpose campus sport facilities.
Kelby Chappelle

Kelby Chappelle

Director of Admissions

chappelle_k@mitchell.edu
860-701-5043

Christina Chappelle

Christina Chappelle

Director of Advising

chappelle_c@mitchell.edu
860-701-5024

Flex: Evening & Weekend Classes Begin September 4

Ready to finish (or begin) your degree? Propel your career? Challenge yourself? Learn new skills? Mitchell College flexes with your busy life by offering Evening and Weekend Classes, September 4-November 22, 2019.

New, prospective students, please contact Kelby Chappelle in Admissions at chappelle_k@mitchell.edu to get the ball rolling!

Currently enrolled Mitchell students, please connect with Advising today about scheduling classes for Fall 2019.

Last day to enroll in the Session I term is Wednesday, September 11, 2019 at 5:00pm

Last day to withdraw from this term with a “W” grade is Friday, November 1 at 5:00pm

Kelby Chappelle

Kelby Chappelle

Director of Admissions

chappelle_k@mitchell.edu
860-701-5043

Christina Chappelle

Christina Chappelle

Director of Advising

chappelle_c@mitchell.edu
860-701-5024

Saturday Classes Session I

September 4-November 22, 2019

Course Title Time Notes Description
BU123 Introduction to Business 8:00am-12:10pm (Saturday) 3 credits Explores the nature of the American free enterprise system and its business organization. Gives students a broad overview of the functions, institutions, principles, practices and a working vocabulary of business. NOTE: BU123 is recommended for all students for personal or business use. It is recommended that students take BU123 before studying other business subjects. A minimum grade of C is required for business majors to enroll in additional business courses and to meet graduation requirements.
FC120 Information Technology Literacy 8:00am-12:10pm (Saturday) 3 credits This course is designed to introduce students to 21st Century technology literacy skills. By leveraging the knowledge and skills students have in using technology, this course, through a collaborative project based approach, will focus on developing an awareness and knowledge of how to critically analyze and determine the meaningfulness, relevance and applicability of acquired information. In addition, this course will help students enhance their technology literacy skills through the use of resources including Microsoft Office Suite, Presentation Software and Cloud Technologies/Services, and Advanced Technologies and Applications. NOTE: A minimum grade of C- is required to meet graduation requirements.
HI105 History of the United States I 10:30am-2:40pm (Saturday) 3 credits This introductory survey course examines the European colonization of North America, the challenges of the colonial era, including the American Revolution and development of constitutionalism as well as the early national period, the rise of Jacksonian Democracy, and the hardships faced by multiple groups such as Native American, African Americans and immigrants. Race-based slavery in America, western expansionism, the growth of political parties, women’s rights, and the causes and consequences of the Civil War will also be examined.
PY105 General Psychology I 8:00am-12:10pm (Saturday) 3 credits Explores the scientific methods and principles of behavior. Includes areas of physiological psychology, sensation and perception, conditioning and learning, memory, and states of consciousness, motivation and emotion as major topics for lectures and discussions. NOTE: One section will be designated for majors in the Department of Behavioral Sciences.

Evening Classes Session I

September 4-November 22, 2019

Course Title Time Notes Description
BU124 Marketing 4:40pm-6:40pm (M & Th) or 4:40pm-6:40pm (Tu & Fr) 3 credits Overviews all marketing activities, with specific study of market research, demographics, product development, pricing, retailing and wholesaling of goods, promotional activities, advertising, sales and selling steps. Uses marketing problems and cases as class activities.
CJ265 Probation and Parole 4:40pm-6:40pm (M & Th) 3 credits Prerequisite: CJ247 Probation and Parole will review the application of probation and parole methods in the criminal justice system. Organization and operation of these systems will be explored.
CW102 College Writing and Research 6:50pm-8:50pm (M & Th) 3 credits Prerequisite: CW101 (C- grade or better), the equivalent, or permission of the instructor. This course reinforces the skills taught in CW101 while introducing students to the procedures of academic and professional research. Assignments will emphasize writing to analyze and synthesize ideas, information literacy skills for finding and evaluating appropriate sources, and proper documentation of sources. This is a writing intensive (WI) course, requiring students to submit a minimum of 15 pages of revised and edited text in finished form including a fully documented research paper. NOTE: A minimum grade of C- is required to meet graduation requirements and to enroll in 200-level or above English courses.
ED274 Literacy Develop. Early Childhood Education 4:40pm-6:40pm (M & Th) 3 credits Pre-Practicum Component: 20-25 hours in PreK–K Prerequisite: ED110, ED222 This course provides a greater understanding of the importance of early childhood education and its relationship to early literacy development. The students will explore such topics as symbol systems, abstractions, comprehension, schema development and prior knowledge as they relate to the emerging sense of literacy. Stories, songs, rhymes, riddles, poetry, short stories, picture books, and the world of children’s literature are also included in connection to early childhood education programs and kindergarten settings, family, school and the community. Standards of National Association of Young Children and Common Core State Standards are used.
FC120 Information Technology Literacy 6:50pm-8:50pm (M & Th) 3 credits This course is designed to introduce students to 21st Century technology literacy skills. By leveraging the knowledge and skills students have in using technology, this course, through a collaborative project based approach, will focus on developing an awareness and knowledge of how to critically analyze and determine the meaningfulness, relevance and applicability of acquired information. In addition, this course will help students enhance their technology literacy skills through the use of resources including Microsoft Office Suite, Presentation Software and Cloud Technologies/Services, and Advanced Technologies and Applications. NOTE: A minimum grade of C- is required to meet graduation requirements.
HU215 World Geography of Tourism 4:40pm-6:40pm (M & Th) 3 credits This course is an introduction to world geography through the lens of tourism destinations and markets. Students explore and gain a functional base knowledge about physical-environmental, socio-cultural, and geopolitical influences on the travel and tourism industry. Students investigate the fundamental link between international travel and world geography. Emphasis is place on the strategic location of specific destinations, characteristics of the tourist markets, and the transportation infrastructure and hospitality superstructure found in major destinations. In addition, this course will focus on international travel patterns and trends.
PY313 Death and Dying 4:40pm-6:40pm (M & Th) 3 credits Prerequisite: HD305 Death and Dying offers a multidisciplinary approach to the study of thanatology. Topics include psychological states of the dying process, attitudes toward death, the physiology of death, counseling the terminally ill, the Hospice concept, widowhood, bereavement and mourning, suicide, funerals, family support, and the treatment of the deceased from a historical standpoint.
SM302 Sport Facilities (HYBRID: portions will be online) 6:50pm-8:50pm (M) 3 credits Prerequisite: SM110 and junior or senior status or permission of the instructor. This course investigates the functions of management in terms of planning, building, operating, and financing public assembly facilities and special sport event venue management, including public and private arenas, stadiums, and multi-purpose campus sport facilities.

A few words on fit.

 

"Fit” is the modern buzzword of the college search process. And frankly, rightly so. As you consider your college experience, we encourage you to look for a place that feels right. It’s also a good idea to make a list of the qualities and characteristics that make a college and you a winning combination.

 

If you are looking for a college that: 

 

  • Gets to know and understand each student as a uniquely talented individual

  • Identifies potential and encourages students in very intentional ways

  • Fosters growth in each student, giving them a foundation for life and career success

  • Is small enough to deliver on the promise of a personalized experience

  • Goes beyond “career services” and offers a progressive 4-year career development model, partnering with local businesses and nonprofits for professional experience

  • Promotes an inclusive culture that encourages students to experiment in new clubs and activities

  • Is nationally recognized for its academic support systems, from professional content tutors (not students) to proven comprehensive support for students with learning differences

  • Connects students to service opportunities that impact their world

  • Is in a location that offers access to New England’s natural places and some of America’s greatest cities

 

 

 

…Mitchell College delivers in a powerful way.

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